Alaska Serial Killer Joshua Wade

How many people did he murder?

Robin Barefield

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Did Joshua Wade murder both men and women as he suggested, or did he only prey on women? How many victims did this angry man kill?

Two dangerous monsters stalked the streets of Anchorage from 2000 to 2012. Israel Keyes, who moved to Anchorage in 2007, was cold and cunning. Many serial-killer experts consider Keyes to be one of the most intelligent, organized serial killers of all times. He randomly chose victims who lived thousands of miles from his home, and he stashed murder kits around the country, planning to access them at some future date. It is easy to understand why authorities didn’t capture Israel Keyes sooner than they did. He methodically planned his crimes and always had an exit strategy.

Joshua Wade, who likely began killing before 2000 proved to be a different type of predator than Keyes. Investigators considered Wade intelligent, but he did not stalk his victims or plan his crimes. His crimes appeared sloppy, happened on the spur of the moment, and were usually the result of him losing his temper. The legal system should have stopped Joshua Wade long before it did.

According to a 2015 University of Alaska Justice Center victimization survey, fifty out of every one-hundred women residing in Alaska have experienced intimate partner violence, sexual violence, or both. A 2016 report by the Violence Policy Center ranked Alaska first nation-wide as the state with the highest homicide rate per capita of female victims killed by male offenders. Alaska Native women are the most at-risk group to become victims of violent crimes. Alaska Natives comprise only 20% of the state’s population, but Alaska Native women represent 54% of Alaska’s sexual assault victims. Compared to all other women in the U.S., Alaska Native women are ten times more likely to experience domestic violence.

In September 2000, Shelia Toomey with the Anchorage Daily News wrote a front-page story about six unsolved homicides in Anchorage. The article displayed the photos of the six victims. All were women; five were Native Alaskan and one was African American. Nothing connected the victims, and police did not know if they were looking for one, two, or six murderers. Thirty-three-year-old Della Brown was the last of the six victims to be found.

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Robin Barefield

I am an Alaska wilderness mystery author and a podcaster: Murder and Mystery in the Last Frontier. https://murder-in-the-last-frontier.blubrry.net